People marched on 1/21. These are their stories: Nikie Guccione

As a green card holder, I’m a legal resident but not allowed to vote. Marching was a way to make my voice heard and participate in the political process.

As a green card holder, I’m a legal resident but not allowed to vote. Marching was a way to make my voice heard and participate in the political process. I went to Washington, DC with a group of great friends and their daughters. The youngest was my friend’s daughter Lizzie, who is 12, and my friend Trish was the oldest at 56. We had two in their teens, one in her 20’s, one in her 30’s, three in our 40’s, and one in her 50’s. Five decades of pissed off women.

The March made me feel energized and connected, which I needed after an election that left me numb and depressed. The whole experience made me feel hopeful and empowered, and I was very touched when an old man on the way to the starting point of the March who cheered for us and thanked us for doing this. “We need you,” he said.

The signs were amazing. I was so impressed with the creativity of people. The one that stood out the most to me was an embroidery sampler that said “I’m so angry I made this just so I could stab something 3000 times”. Another said
“We shall overcomb”.

Now that I’m back home, I have started to make a monthly donation to Planned Parenthood. I’m also sending postcards to the White House and calling my representatives.

©2017 Nadine Robbins. Unauthorized use of the images and copy from these stories is prohibited.