People marched on 1/21. These are their stories: Joanne Gelb

It wasn’t just a walk, it wasn’t just a day. It was standing together for the values and beliefs that I’ve always hoped I was passing on.

When I was a girl in Brooklyn, I was on my high school’s Strike committee against the Vietnam War. I recently remembered that my Mother allowed me to have a Strike meeting at our house, though all I heard afterwards was how awful it was that the teacher who worked with us sat on the arm of my mother’s couch and could have broken it. Still, as I recently realized, it was pretty special that I was allowed to have this meeting at home. It wasn’t a particularly political home.

As I’ve grown older, in my heart, being political and standing up for beliefs has always been important to me. The Women’s March, the March Over the Walkway was the first time my daughter and I shared doing anything with these beliefs. It was incredibly important and meaningful to me that my daughter AND my grand daughter and myself took this walk together. It wasn’t just a walk, it wasn’t just a day. It was standing together for the values and beliefs that I’ve always hoped I was passing on.

While reading an article from the NY Times called “I’m Pro-Life, and Pro-Refugee“, I decided to respond in the comment section with this:

A thoughtful article, I appreciate it. I too am pro-life and I am pro-choice. I don’t advocate women to get abortions but I will not deny any women that choice. This choice is between a woman and her conscience or god. I appreciate that you are looking and seeing how expansive the ‘pro-life or rather anti--abortion’ choice is. What about this same administration wanting to cut or take away help for those women who choose to keep their child? What about the death penalty? We cannot mingle church and state, we never were supposed to. What if my faith dictates that I worship the sun as god and therefore I want to abolish daylight savings time. Is the government supposed to make laws to protect my beliefs no matter what they are? If someone blasphemes, should we make it a law that they be stoned to death? MAKING LAWS THAT FOLLOW A SINGLE RELIGION IS THE SAME AS SHARIA LAW. I appreciate your beliefs but if you are against abortion, please don’t have one. And work to help those women who cannot keep their babies. Adopt one or two or three? And what about health concerns for a mother? Or instances of rape or incest? Federal money does not pay for abortions. 97% of what Planned Parenthood does is give health care to women. This is by the government allowing Medicaid to pay for exams and other health concerns for women. Thank you for thinking this through."

It wasn’t just a walk, it wasn’t just a day. It was standing together for the values and beliefs that I’ve always hoped I was passing on.

©2017 Nadine Robbins. Unauthorized use of the images and copy from these stories is prohibited.