On display this weekend at The Millerton Moviehouse: The artists of the Hudson Valley: Norm Magnusson, Audrey Francis, Robert Hite, Roxie Johnson, and Nadine Robbins.

Please join us for the opening of the winter 2018 Showcase Exhibition featuring the work of 5 extraordinary artists:

Norm Magnusson

Audrey Francis

Robert Hite

Roxie Johnson

Nadine Robbins

THE MOVIEHOUSE STUDIO GALLERY - WINTER EXHIBITION 2018

November 3, 2018

February 6, 2019
Opening Reception: Saturday, November 3, 4:00 – 6:00 pm

MILLERTON, NY---Continuing its mission to showcase the work of accomplished local artists, The Moviehouse Studio Gallery is pleased to announce the opening of its Winter Exhibition featuring the work of five outstanding Hudson Valley artists — Audrey Francis, Robert Hite, Roxie Johnson, Norm Magnusson and Nadine Robbins. It's been some time since The Moviehouse hosted a group show and we are delighted to be able to bring these five wonderfully talented artists to the region.

Each of the artists featured live and work in the central Hudson Valley and each is a master in their oeuvre, but there are common threads that run through all the work on exhibit that speak to current social issues.

Conceptually, much of the Audrey Francis' work explores not only her own Latina heritage but also the gendered language of the body and adornment in juxtaposition to elemental forms in nature. Nadine Robbins' work is decidedly at the intersection of identity politics presenting the feminine form in new and unexpected ways, allowing a dynamic to evolve between the viewer and the viewed, and as well upsetting the traditional roles of the male gaze and the feminine subject.

Robert Hite's pieces contain sociological and humanistic themes and narratives. Images of structures, dwellings and living spaces have become central to his recent work. Roxie Johnson's work, although abstract and conceptual, is also deeply empathetic and humanistic, triggered by a word, a moment, an impression left behind with every mark clearly driven by emotion, intuition and the uncertainty in life. In his "Decorating Nature" series, Norm Magnusson aims to explore mankind’s complicated relationship with nature and our desire to make it conform to our demands.

The exhibition delivers a visually vibrant and powerful treat for the eyes along with much food for thought.

There will be an opening reception on Saturday, November 3rd from 4:00 – 6:00 p.m. to which all are invited to meet the artists. Refreshments will be served.

The exhibition is free & open to the public and all works on exhibit are available for purchase.

The Moviehouse is located at 48 Main Street, Millerton, NY 12546, 518.789.0022
themoviehouse.net

ABOUT THE ARTISTS

Audrey Francis began her artistic career with fine art studies at Syracuse University (BFA) followed by a residency at the Nantucket Island School of Design and the Arts, Massachusetts. Francis has taught painting at SUNY, New Paltz and design at Dutchess Community College. Formally trained as an illustrator, the artist’s established practice includes oil painting, collage, sculpture, and textile art. In her evocative paintings and mixed media works, Francis uses a sequence of motifs seemingly taken from deeply personal and mysterious iconography and pairs these with flat planes of color and pattern. Early work included hyper-realistic drapery studies and nudes and a series of pictures concerned with the tradition of Latin saints. Experiments with collage evolved into neo-surrealist works depicting fantastic interiors. Using oil medium as well as pastel, Francis’ photo-realist effect of light and drapery creates an illuminated sculptural study of figure, fabric, and space. Conversely, flatness is a guiding principal in her collage series and the most recent paintings. In these works, negative space is paired with figurative and abstract patterning in bright hues.

Audrey is the recipient of various awards and honors, the most recent including the Research and Creative Projects Award, SUNY, 2006; The Joan Mitchell Award Nomination, 2006 and the Barrett Art Center Award, Poughkeepsie, New York, 2001. She lives in Rhinebeck. Saatchi art

Robert Hite was born in 1956 and spent his childhood just outside of Bowling Green, a small town in rural Virginia. During his formative youth, Hite traveled in the Caribbean, Europe, Asia, and South America.  He spent a stint as a studio assistant for the Washington Color School painter Leon Berkowitz and enjoyed success in the eighties and early nineties as an abstract landscape artist in Washington, DC. Hite has shown his work widely, most notably solo shows at The Nassau County Museum, Berkshire Museum and Hancock Shaker Museum.

Hite was awarded the Guggenheim Fellowship in 2014.

Hite now works in photography, painting, and sculpture, although they often intersect through common imagery and sentiment. In 1997, Hite and his family moved to Esopus, NY, a small town in the Hudson Valley where he converted an 1840’s Methodist church into his home and studio. http://roberthite.com/

Roxie Johnson holds an MFA in Illustration from Syracuse University and has worked as both fine artist and visual arts educator for more than four decades. Known for her unique approach to the etching process, Johnson has studied with master printers Ron Pokrasso and Dan Welden, and been the recipient of awards on both the east and west coast, twice from the National Association of Women Artists. It was during her printmaking career that her cut, paste and layering process developed through use of camera and digital technology and as she transitioned to abstract painting, her collage techniques remain prevalent as one of the trademarks of her work.

Johnson's greeting card designs have been recognized by the Smithsonian Institute Archives of American Art and her prints and paintings have been shown widely in national and local juried competitions, as well as in galleries of the Mid-Hudson Valley and metropolitan area. https://roxiejohnson.com/

Norm Magnusson Norm Magnusson is a New York-based artist and political activist and founder, in 1991, of the art movement 'funism', he began his career creating allegorical animal paintings with pointed social commentaries. Eventually he became more and more interested in political art and its potential for persuasion, but he always likes to retain a certain whimsy and humor in his work. In his 'Decorating Nature' series of photographs, Magnusson paints on, or colors, pieces of nature, like adding stripes to a fallen leaf, painting a pine cone blue or drawing concentric rings on a stone. Magnusson says that "We use nature how we see fit: we strive to bring order to it, we try to make it prettier, we try to make it more profitable." The images in the series are all about those things ­— but also about beauty. For Magnusson, beauty is the friend of consideration. "If a picture is pretty, the viewer will spend more time with it. If a viewer spends more time with it, they will begin to think beyond the surface of it and, perhaps, begin to consider the deeper meaning of it."

Norm's work can be found in the permanent collection of The Museum of Modern Art(Franklin Furnace Artist's Book Archive), The Springfield Museum of Art, The Anchorage Museum of History and Art, The Pember Museum and numerous other public and private collections, and, before it closed, at the infamous East Village Bridgewater/Lustberg Gallery in NYC. His sculptures of historical markers were shown as the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum's 2007 Main Street Sculpture Project, a show entitled "On this site stood." In his review of that exhibition for The New York Times, Ben Gennochio called Magnusson "The Michael Moore of the highways" for the very liberal "unsparing and pitiless candor" of his art, which focuses "our attention on pressing contemporary social and political issues." http://www.funism.com/art/index.html

Nadine Robbins' contemporary style is distinguished by a masterly command of academic painting techniques paired with an irreverence for rules, gender and beauty. Much of the painter’s practice focuses on themes of defiance. Robbins has earned great admiration for her iconoclastic nudes, as well as an ongoing series of portraits that oscillate between the mysterious and the candid. Robbins’ use of luscious jewel toned paint and high-fidelity realism ties the artist to the late twentieth-century and contemporary traditions of hyper-realism, photo-realism, and super-realism. Robbins’ montage-like use of atelier technique and way of working adds a studied complexity that is enticing and refined.

As well as a solo exhibition at Brill Gallery, Massachusetts, 2009 Robbins has shown widely in group shows such as Perspectives of the American Experience, American Women Artists, Rockwell Museum, Corning, New York, 2018; Figurative Masters, Arcadia Contemporary, Culver City, California; The Wausau Museum of Contemporary Art, Wisconsin; Women Painting Women, RJD Gallery, South Hampton, New York; The 12th Annual Group Show, International Guild of Realism, Winfield Gallery, Carmel, California; Dissent; Sparrow Gallery; Attention to Detail, Robert Lange Studios, Charleston, South Carolina and Formation, A Painting Survey in conjunction with Poets & Artists, Bernarducci.Meisel, New York.

Robbins is the recipient of a grant from the Puffin Foundation, 2017 and in 2015, Robbins was selected for the special feature Poets and Artists, 50 Memorable Painters and was listed as "one of top figurative painters working now…" by Buzzfeed, 2018. The artist’s work may be found in several important private collections, most notably the Howard A. & Judith Tullman Collection, Chicago and The Count-Ibex Collection, Germany. https://www.nadinerobbinsart.com/

Am I blacklisted from social media?

 The Golden Hour, Oil on Linen, 24”x24”

The Golden Hour, Oil on Linen, 24”x24”

A troubling thing happened this past week. I posted my new painting “The Golden Hour” on social media. I thought it would be easy to get the word out and wanted to boost the post where I could. But my post was rejected from IG for the following reasons (Email I received from Facebook/Instagram after my appeal):

Hi Nadine,

Here's what's preventing your ad from being approved:

Image:We don't allow ads that imply nudity, for example, through blurring or cropping. I suggest you try using content that focuses on your product or service rather than on nudity.

The reason behind our policies:

We don't allow ads with content that features sexually suggestive positioning or that shows a lot of skin (even if it's for an artistic or education reason) because of their highly sensitive nature. I suggest you have a look at our Advertising Policies for more details, including some do's and don'ts.

What to do next:

Try editing your ad by following the policy guidelines mentioned above. You can do that through Ads Manager here.You can also check out Facebook Blueprint, which allows you to go through our self-paced e-learning module on Facebook's Advertising Policies.

Was this helpful? Let us know.

No this wasn’t fucking helpful! It was infuriating. I appealed to them again and so far have been ignored and I will not change my post.

Being censored by social media is nothing new. It’s a risk I was willing to take and I have been reprimanded in various ways as if I were a child being scolded. I’ve resigned myself to blurring nipples and crotches but this still gets me into trouble. But this last rejection goes too far.

It seems for now the only safe place from censorship is my blog. So I hope you’ll visit from time to time or sign-up for the feed.

As always, thanks for you support.